Knowledge

Upon completion of the IE degree program, students will be able to:

  • Understand and articulate how the historical context and social, political, economic, and cultural forces shape education around the world
  • Articulate their critical understanding of education systems around the world with emphases on social justice, equity, inclusion, and diversity
  • Demonstrate their knowledge of influential theories in the international education field
  • Understand the perspectives, relationships, roles, and influences of the stakeholders in the International Education field
  • Articulate how power, privilege, and oppression mediate educational practices around the world
  • Articulate how international education policy is developed and implemented at the institutional, local, state, regional, national, and international levels

Skills

Upon completion of the IE degree program, students will be able to:

  • Apply fundamental research skills including conceptualizing, designing, conducting, and presenting original research in the IE field
  • Design, deliver, and evaluate international education programs (including proposal preparation, needs assessment, curriculum design, budgeting, human resource management, health and safety, crisis management, marketing, recruitment, and evaluation)
  • Create and implement IE-education related content through writing, facilitation, and public speaking

Attitudes

Upon completion of the IE degree program, students will commit to:

  • Promote equity, inclusion, diversity, and social justice in education
  • Uphold high ethical standards and critical reflexivity in all aspects of one’s professional work
  • Value reciprocity in knowledge - and skills-sharing

Courses

Semester 1: Chile (13 credits + language study)

  • Foundations in Intercultural Service, Leadership, and Management (3 credits): This course introduces students to intercultural communication, effective multicultural team management, and organizational leadership and change. The course begins with a one-week, face-to-face intensive seminar just after orientation, and will continue on-line for an additional 8 weeks.
  • Educational Practice and Policy in Chile (3 credits): This course explores the historical, social, political (post-conflict), and economic (neoliberal) contexts of Chilean education. It includes field trips within Santiago to visit educational programs and associations and a four-day excursion to Temuco for students to learn about models of and issues related to indigenous education, bilingual education, autonomous education, decolonization of education, and Mapuche values and educational practices.
  • Educational Theory and Practice (3 credits): This course introduces students to educational theories including neo-Marxist and conflict theories, communist theory, structural functionalism, human capital theory, post-colonialism, and feminist theory; why they are important; and how they are used to frame learning and work in the field. The course also explores advocacy and citizen/public diplomacy within the Chilean, Vietnamese, and U.S. contexts.
  • Practitioner Inquiry (3 credits): This course introduces principles of qualitative research methods for ethical research and inquiry.
  • Reflective Practice (1 credit): This course provides the academic frame for orientation, student Learning Plans, reflections about your intercultural experiences/learning, professional development, and planning for the upcoming practicum and capstone.
  • Spanish: Students will take a placement test at the start of the program, the results of which will determine the appropriate placement level for a conversational Spanish course. Note: undergraduate credit does not count toward the master’s degree.

Semester 2: Vietnam (9 credits + language study, allows more time for practicum search)

  • Educational Practice and Policy in Vietnam (3 credits): This course explores the historical, social, political (post-war), and economic (communist) contexts of Vietnamese education. It includes field trips within Ho Chi Minh City to visit educational programs and associations.
  • IE Program Planning & Design (5 credits): This course walks students through the program development and implementation process. Topics include proposal writing, needs assessment and evaluation, curriculum development, student learning/development theory, internationalization, marketing and recruitment, logistics and staffing, budget preparation, risk assessment, health and safety, and crisis management. This course also features a 3-day homestay over the Tet holiday in which students experience a first-hand case study in how programs promote intercultural learning through immersion.
  • Reflective Practice (1 credit): This course provides the academic frame for ongoing orientation, student Learning Plans, and reflections about their intercultural experiences/learning. In the spring term, the curriculum is focused on helping students identify and secure a practicum.
  • Vietnamese: Students will take a placement test at the start of the program, the results of which will determine the appropriate placement level for a conversational Vietnamese course. Note: undergraduate credit does not count toward the master’s degree.

Semesters 3 and 4: Practicum and Capstone Research in Location of Student Choice; Capstone Seminar on Vermont campus (8 credits each semester)

See details under “Professional Practicum” just below.