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Master of Arts in International Education (On Campus)

Master of Arts in International Education (On Campus)

Learn to plan and manage international education programs from a leader in the field.

classroomSIT Graduate Institute offers students the unique opportunity of earning a master’s degree in international education from an institution that provides international exchange, study abroad, and development programs. Students have valuable access to well-regarded international education and exchange programs, including SIT Study Abroad and The Experiment in International Living, administered from the SIT/World Learning campus.

Through SIT’s experiential learning model, students develop skills and expertise related to advising, exchange management, nonformal and community education, and volunteer program management. Students may also take courses from the practitioner faculty teaching in SIT’s other degree programs to learn skills related to language teaching administration, sustainable development, conflict transformation, and other related areas as desired.

The program combines faculty instruction with personal practice, analysis, and experience. Students examine the effect of globalism, internationalization efforts, changing technology, and educational policy on international education programs while also practicing skills and strategies in program development and management.

SIT's Master of Arts in International Education program formally prepares more professionals in the field of international education than any other university in the world today and is the oldest program of its kind.

On-Campus Coursework
Two Terms (9 months)
(minimum 29 credits)
Practicum
Two–Three Terms  (6–12 months)
(12 credits)
Capstone Paper and Presentation
Fall Term: September–December
Field Courses (optional): January
Language Intensives (optional): January
Spring Term: January–May
Two or three terms working with an organization Final paper and presentation on campus

In addition to the required core courses, the international education degree provides an opportunity to combine interests in working with specific constituencies or program themes by combining courses through students' choice of a minimum of 11 elective credits. In this way, students can explore interests and develop skills related to advising, exchange management, nonformal and community education, volunteer program management, language teaching administration, or the other degree areas of sustainable development or conflict transformation.

Selection of actual electives will depend on each student's combination of prior experience, competencies, interests, and semesters of study. These thematic areas serve as guides to assist in course selection and will not be displayed on the final transcript with the actual list of courses taken.

To see the careers that international education students typically have after graduation, visit the Alumni Careers section below.

  • Core Coursework (18 credits)
    During students’ nine months on SIT’s campus in Vermont, they examine the historical, theoretical, and social foundations of international education programs. The curriculum also includes skills-oriented courses that cover all aspects of program design and management, program advocacy, and participant support.
    The following courses are required:
    • Foundations in Intercultural Service, Leadership, and Management – 4 credits
    • Practitioner Inquiry – 2 credits
    • International Educational Policy – 3 credits
    • International Education Design and Delivery – 3 credits
    • Theory and Practice of International Education – 3 credits
    • International Education Design Concepts and Evaluation – 3 credits
       
  • Electives (11 credits minimum)
    Students can satisfy the program’s elective requirement in a number of ways, including by attending SIT courses offered in Vermont, participating in field courses offered around the world (most recently in Bangladesh, Mexico, and Turkey), or pursuing independent study. Students can also choose to take a course at a local institution and transfer the credit to SIT. Please note that in this situation, the course must be at the graduate level and the institution must be accredited.
Students choose from the following courses:*
  • Training Design for Experiential Learning – 3 credits
  • Social Identity: Exclusion and Inclusion – 3 credits
  • Dismantling Disability – 2 credits
  • Cross-Cultural Counseling – 3 credits
  • Theory and Practice of Conflict Transformation – 3 credits
  • Skills and Practices in Inter-Group Dialogue – 1 credit
  • Mediation – 2 credits
  • Conflict and Identity – 3 credits
  • Education for Social Justice – 3 credits
  • Issues Seminar in International Education – 1 credit
  • Special Topics in International Education – 1 credit
  • Issues Seminar in International Education Programming – 1 credit
  • Nonprofit, NGO, and Social Business Management – 3 credits
  • Financial Management – 3 credits
  • Fundraising and Grantwriting – 2 credits
  • Human Resources Management – 3 credits
  • Strategic Management – 3 credits
  • Strategic Planning and Implementation – 3 credits
  • Social Entrepreneurship – 3 credits
  • Leadership and Change – 3 credits
  • Statistics for Practitioners – 1 credit
  • Independent Study – 1–2 credits
  • Youth Program Leadership – 3 credits
  • Economics – 3 credits
  • Issues in Sustainable Development – 3 credits
  • Training for Social Action – 3 credits
  • Policy Advocacy – 3 credits
  • International Policy and Citizen Advocacy – 1 credit
  • Leadership, Community, and Coalition Building – 3 credits
  • Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development – 3 credits
  • Popular and Nonformal Education – 2 credits
  • Becoming a Teacher Educator
  • Introduction to Adult Education in the United States
  • Sociolinguistics
  • The Politics of English: TESOL Problematized
  • English Applied Linguistics
* Not all listed classes will be offered each academic year. Course offerings depend on a minimum enrollment of ten (10) students.
 
  • Reflective Practice (12 credits)
    This portion of the program is a structured approach for students to apply coursework learning to a related professional activity. During this phase, students receive course credit for documenting the integration of their knowledge and skills, working in a professional context, for a minimum of six months, while remaining engaged with faculty and other students on the program. Students can complete the practicum in the US or abroad.
     
  • Capstone Paper and Seminar
    Students demonstrate, assess, and synthesize their learning through preparation of a capstone project and participation in a one-week capstone seminar held multiple times each year on SIT’s campus in Vermont. Researching and writing the capstone paper takes students deeply into the experiential learning cycle, where they explore the meaning of their practicum experience, integrate theory and practice in a written and oral presentation, and make a contribution to the field of international education. Review past International Education capstone papers.

Degree Requirements
Students have five years from the time they enter the program to complete all degree requirements. (For any student who, because of special circum­stances, studies part-time during two consecutive on-campus academic years, the program entry date is calculated from the beginning of their second on-campus year.) A student who does not complete all degree requirements (including the language and culture proficiency requirement) within five years of the entry date will be withdrawn from the program. A student with extenuating circumstances must apply to the dean of the program for an extension.

All students must fulfill a Language and Culture Proficiency Requirement before they are eligible to graduate.

View the current academic calendar.

Study abroad as part of your master’s degree program.

International and US-Based Intensive Courses
Students have the option of completing a short-term intensive course at sites in the US or abroad. Typically ranging in duration from one to four weeks, recent intensives have been offered in Washington, DC; Bangladesh; Mexico; and Turkey.

Intensive field courses offer students pursuing an MA in international education the chance to interact with practitioners in the field, learn on-site, and expand professional networking. Short-term intensives are typically offered in January. Learn more about the intensive field courses.

View our 2015 course offerings

Apply the knowledge and skills you acquire in the classroom while engaging in the field of international education in real-world settings.

Professional Practicum
Following the on-campus coursework phase, each student completes a professional practicum with an organization of his/her choosing.* The practicum must be related to the student’s coursework and career goals and be for a minimum of six months. Practicums may be paid professional positions or unpaid internships.
 
study abroad fairDuring this period — referred to as Reflective Practice — students remain engaged with faculty and other students and receive course credit for documenting the integration of their knowledge and skills while working in a professional context.
 
Practicum placements provide in-depth, hands-on learning; enhance résumés; and expand professional contacts.
 
Recent practicum placements held by students in the international education program include:
 
United States

  • International Admissions Counselor, University of Indianapolis (Indianapolis, Indiana)
  • Advisor, International Students, Johnson & Wales University (Providence, Rhode Island)
  • Re-Entry Program Coordinator, SIT Study Abroad (Brattleboro, Vermont)
  • International Education Coordinator, Greenville Technical College (Greenville, South Carolina)
  • Study Abroad Advisor, St. Norbert College (De Pere, Wisconsin)
  • Coordinator, AFS Intercultural Programs (New York, New York)
  • Program Representative, World Heritage (Henderson, Colorado)
  • Program Coordinator of International Student Activities, Presbyterian College (Clinton, South Carolina)
  • Marketing Coordinator, Center for Cross-Cultural Study (Amherst, Massachusetts)
  • Interpreter Coordinator, Refugee Development Center (Lansing, Michigan)
  • International Visitors Program Intern, World Affairs Council of Seattle (Seattle, Washington)
  • Science Department Fellow, City on a Hill Charter School (Roxbury, Massachusetts)
  • Cross-Cultural Communications Intern, Nebraska Electronics (La Vista, Nebraska)
  • Program Coordinator, International Language Institute (Northampton, Massachusetts)
  • Youth Programs Staff, SIT/World Learning, Vermont
  • Intern Resident Advisor, Showa Boston Institute for Language and Culture
  • On-Site Program Coordinator, BorderLinks, Mexico/Arizona
  • Intern, Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program
  • Cross Cultural Communications Intern, Nebraska Electronics
  • Programs Coordinator, International House, New York
  • Program Assistant, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC
  • Program Intern, International Development and Exchange Programs, World Learning, Washington, DC
  • Intern, International Visitors Program, World Affairs Council, Seattle-Tacoma
  • Study Abroad Advisor, St. Norbert College, Wisconsin
  • International Student Advisor, Johnson & Wales University, Rhode Island
  • International Youth Programs Specialist, IREX, Washington, DC
  • Academic Relations Manager, Intrax Cultural Exchange, California

 International

  • Assistant Field Office Coordinator, Semester at Sea (multiple sites)
  • NGO Development Volunteer, Peace Corps (Uganda)
  • Coordinator of Volunteers, Yanapuma Foundation (Quito, Ecuador)
  • Student Affairs Manager, The School for Field Studies (San Carlos, Mexico)
  • ESL Teacher/Teacher Trainer, Peace Corps (China)
  • Graduate Intern, Fulbright Colombia Commission (Bogota, Colombia)
  • International Education Coordinator, ProWorld Mexico (Oaxaca, Mexico)
  • Civil Employee, Department of Education, Jayapura Municipal Government (Papua, Indonesia)
  • Intern, The Umbra Institute (Perugia, Italy)
  • Curriculum Designer, World Education, Thailand
  • International Studies Department Faculty, Xiamen University, China
  • Program Staff, ProWorld Service Corps, Perus/Mexico/India/Ghana
  • Assistant, English Open Doors Program, Ministry of Education, Santiago, Chile
  • Director, Spanish Center, Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Director, Center for English Language, Leaders School, Azerbaijan
  • Advisor: Marketing/Placement, ProWorld Service Corps
  • Program Director, Global Routes Internship Program, Tanzania
  • Intern, Red Gate Gallery Residence Program, China
  • Teacher, Community School, Thailand
  • Intern, Augsburg College, Mexico
  • Program Coordinator, CIEE, Spain

* Students find positions on their own with support from SIT's Career and Practicum Services Center.

Students in the international education degree program often go on to work in the field in a variety of areas.

Advising – Students enter direct service positions such as international student advisor; study abroad advisor; intercultural/international exchange trainer/programmer; international student recruiter, admissions, and placement specialist; and field or sponsoring agency representative for exchange organizations.

Exchange Management – Students may enter administrative or management positions such as director or assistant director in a study abroad or international student services office or manager of program development, supervision, and evaluation in an exchange or educational travel organization.

Nonformal and Community Education – Students work with multicultural education programs in institutions, communities, and NGOs planning and/or implementing programs.

Volunteer Program Management – Students in this field are interested in formal and nonformal educational and service-learning programs at the community level, working with community representatives and interns on program design, delivery, and evaluation.

Language Teaching Administration – Students typically have some exposure to language education (including ESL) and would like to manage programs or institutions in this context.

Development Education or Peacebuilding and Conflict Transformation – Students may work in (for development education) nonformal educational settings, education administration in lesser developed countries, teacher education and training, and civil society organizations focused on education or (for peacebuilding and conflict transformation) as international educators in conflict or post-conflict areas, conflict prevention education, or youth programs, among others.


mozambiquePositions held by alumni of the international education program include:

  • International Student and Scholar Advisor, Tufts University, Massachusetts, US
  • Study Abroad Director, University of Kentucky, US
  • Customized Programs Manager, International Studies Abroad, Texas, US
  • International Learning Project Consultant, AFS Intercultural Programs, New York, US
  • French/German Teacher, Solebury School, Pennsylvania, US
  • Director of ESL, Northfield Mt. Hermon School, Massachusetts, US
  • Coordinator of English Programs, Canadilla S.A., Santiago, Chile
  • Arabic Language Coordinator, SIT Study Abroad, Amman, Jordan
  • Education Specialist, Equitas, Kenya
  • Director of Admissions and Institutional Relations, School for Field Studies, Massachusetts, US
Sora Friedman
Sora Friedman

Associate Professor and Chair
International Education

PhD, George Mason University
Distance Education Certificate, University of West Georgia
MIA, School for International Training
BA, University of Maryland

Sora Friedman has worked in the field of international education since 1980, focusing on the administration of adult exchanges in public diplomacy, international training programs, high school exchanges, and international policy advocacy. She joined SIT Graduate Institute's faculty in 2005 and was an adjunct faculty member for three years before that. Sora holds a doctorate in cultural studies as well as a master’s degree in international administration and a certificate in distance education.

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Richard Rodman
Richard Rodman

Professor
International Education

PhD, Georgia State University
SCT, MAEd, Murray State University
AB, Indiana University

Richard Rodman, who holds a doctorate in comparative international education, teaches graduate courses in international education, program planning and project design, social change, and intercultural communication. Richard has a special interest in theory-to-practice modeling in international and experiential education, non-formal education, and intercultural communication.

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Ray Young
Ray Young

Assistant Professor
International Education

EdD, University of Massachusetts Amherst
MEd, University of Massachusetts Amherst
BA, University of Colorado Boulder

Ray received his doctorate in teacher education and curriculum studies and his master’s degree in international education from UMass Amherst.

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Linda Drake Gobbo
Linda Drake Gobbo

Professor
International Education

MBA, University of Massachusetts
MEd, Springfield College
BA, Hartwick College

A former dean of SIT Graduate Institute and member of the faculty since 1984, Linda Drake Gobbo teaches courses and advises students in international education and management in both the online and face-to-face programs. She has travelled as faculty with SIT Graduate Institute programs, and has also provided administrative support from the home campus to various SIT Study Abroad programs in such areas as crisis management, health, student development, and professional staff support.

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Janet Y. Thomas
Janet Y. Thomas

Associate Professor
International Education

PhD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
EdM, Widener University
BA, Norfolk State University

Janet Y. Thomas received her PhD in educational policy studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She also has an EdM in educational psychology from Widener University and a BA in the sociology of education from Norfolk State University.

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David Shallenberger
David Shallenberger

Professor
International Education

PhD, Fielding Institute
MBA, Stanford University
BA, Pomona College

David Shallenberger joined SIT Graduate Institute’s international education program in 2006, after four years serving as director of European and Middle Eastern studies for SIT Study Abroad. He also served for one year as dean of SIT Graduate Institute.

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William Hoffa
William Hoffa

Adjunct Faculty
International Education

PhD, University of Wisconsin
MA, Harvard University
BA, University of Michigan

Bill Hoffa holds a PhD from the University of Wisconsin. He spent his early academic years as a professor of English and American Studies at Vanderbilt University and Hamilton College and was founding director of the American Studies program at Hamilton.

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Lynée Connelly
Lynée Connelly

Adjunct Faculty
International Education

MA, SIT Graduate Institute
BA, University of New Hampshire

Lynée Connelly holds a BA in linguistics and Italian and an MA in international education. She is currently a PhD student at the California Institute for Integral Studies. Her dissertation focuses on the influence and impact of international education during the five-year post-reentry period.

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Katie Gilbertson
Katie Gilbertson

Adjunct Faculty
International Education

MA, SIT Graduate Institute

Katie Gilbertson is the director of International Student Services at Johnson & Wales University (JWU) which has 2,000 students on four campuses (Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, and Providence). She has a master’s degree from SIT Graduate Institute (founded as the School for International Training), and over 18 years of experience in the field of international education.

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Carrie Wojenski
Carrie Wojenski

Adjunct Faculty
International Education

EdD, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
MA, SIT Graduate Institute
BA, Wheaton College

Carrie Wojenski is the director of Global Affairs at Sacred Heart University. She is charged with oversight of study abroad programming and global initiatives. As co-chair of the university’s internationalization task force, Carrie assists senior management and the university community in defining the strategic goals associated with internationalization, as well as articulating the trends and developments in higher education related to internationalization and global engagement

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vermont campus

To be considered for admission to the MA in International Education program, an applicant must meet the following criteria:

  • US bachelor's degree or an equivalent that demonstrates academic ability
  • Demonstrated English language ability (see details below)
  • Intercultural and professional experience
  • Demonstrated ability to use experience as a source of learning 

English Language Ability
Applicants whose first language is not English and who did not attend an undergraduate institution at which the language of instruction was English must take either the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System).

  • Applicants taking the TOEFL must receive a minimum score of 550 on the paper-based test or 213 on the computer-based test.
  • For the new Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT), SIT's operational standard for admission for applicants whose first language is not English and who did not attend an undergraduate institution at which the language of instruction was English is a minimum total score of 79. This includes section scores of at least 24 on the writing section and 23 on the speaking section. These section scores should be considered guidelines for recommended minimum scores on the new TOEFL exam.
  • Applicants taking the IELTS must receive a score of Band 6.0 or higher.

These scores are considered the minimum proficiency needed to undertake graduate-level work. Scores must be dated within two years of the start date of your academic program at SIT.
 
SIT Graduate Institute’s Selection Process
Our admissions staff work one-on-one with every applicant to facilitate a highly informed and multidimensional admissions experience: applicants are encouraged to attend an open house, talk with SIT faculty and staff, and hear from current students and alumni. As applicants become familiar with the attributes of an SIT education — grounded in the experiential learning model and focused on social justice and leadership skills in intercultural environments — they determine for themselves in what ways SIT can help them meet their educational and career objectives.

Direct Costs

Tuition and Fees

Year 1 Fall Tuition: $15,630
Year 1 Fall Fees: $785
Year 1 Spring Tuition: $15,630
Year 1 Spring Fees: $785


Year 2 Term 1 Tuition: $2,050
Year 2 Term 2 Tuition: $2,050
Year 2 Term 3 Tuition: $2,050

MA degree total tuition and fees (all terms combined): $38,980

Indirect Costs*

Books and Personal Expenses

Year 1 Fall Books: $400
Year 1 Fall Personal Expenses: $1,350
Year 1 Spring Books: $400
Year 1 Spring Personal Expenses: $1,350


Year 2 Term 1 Books: $400
Year 2 Term 1 Personal Expenses: $1,350
Year 2 Term 2 Books: $400
Year 2 Term 2 Personal Expenses: $1,350
Year 2 Term 3 Books: $400
Year 2 Term 3 Personal Expenses: $900

Housing and Transportation Costs

Year 1 Fall On-Campus Room and Board: $4,420
Year 1 Fall On-Campus Transportation Costs: $600
Year 1 Spring On-Campus Room and Board: $4,420
Year 1 Spring On-Campus Transportation Costs: $600
OR
Year 1 Fall Off-Campus Room and Board*: $5,175
Year 1 Fall Off-Campus Transportation Costs: $1,125
Year 1 Spring Off-Campus Room and Board*: $5,175
Year 1 Spring Off-Campus Transportation Costs: $1,125


Year 2 Term 1 Off-Campus Room and Board*: $5,175
Year 2 Term 1 Transportation Costs: $1,125
Year 2 Term 2 Off-Campus Room and Board*: $5,175
Year 2 Term 2 Transportation Costs: $1,125
Year 2 Term 3 Off-Campus Room and Board*: $3,450
Year 2 Term 3 Transportation Costs: $750

* Note: SIT estimates the costs to students for transportation, personal/miscellaneous expenses, and off-campus housing/food. Individual expenses may vary. Off-campus housing and transportation costs are based on student survey data; individual costs will vary depending on a variety of factors including type of housing and location of practicum.


Additional Costs

Field Study Courses: Costs range from $1,975 to $4,545. See details on the locations, schedule, and costs of individual field courses.

Reflective Practice: Travel, housing, and other costs associated with the reflective practice phase vary depending on location and duration of position.

Health Insurance: Health insurance costs vary by student, and are based on a variety of factors including place of residence, income, age, and policy type.

Estimated Student Loan Fees:

Year 1: $800

Year 2: $300

Estimated fees are based on the average amount borrowed by SIT Graduate Institute students. See details on student loan options.

Billing

Direct costs and on-campus room and board are billed by SIT Graduate Institute. Indirect, off-campus housing costs, transportation expenses, and additional costs are not billed by SIT, but represent educational expenses associated with being an enrolled student.

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