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Master of Arts in Sustainable Development: Advocacy, Leadership, and Social Change

Master of Arts in Sustainable Development: Advocacy, Leadership, and Social Change

“My SIT experience gave me the tools that I needed for a successful career in development. Both through my time on campus and during my practicum I worked on actual proposals and strategic plans, and learned a tremendous amount about intercultural communication and teamwork.”

—Meg Audette, MA in Sustainable Development, Field Programme Support Officer, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA)

Acquire the skills, knowledge, and experience to make significant contributions in the field of development.

el cafeSIT’s Master of Arts in Sustainable Development: Advocacy, Leadership, and Social Change program prepares graduates for positions in organizations working toward a more equitable and sustainable use of the world’s wealth and natural resources.

The program emphasizes the importance of civil society actors and institutions, including NGOs, community programs, social movements, coalitions, and faith-based organizations. Vermont is at the forefront of sustainable development initiatives in the US, and students in the program are able to connect with local communities and relevant organizations, including those led by SIT alumni.

Students in the program can expect to:

  • Develop the analytical and hands-on skills of highly effective development practitioners
  • Examine competing theories and approaches to development  
  • Build competencies in key areas such as community empowerment, monitoring and evaluation, policy analysis, advocacy and training, economic development, program planning, and proposal writing
  • Customize their learning according to individual interests. Students can select to focus on one of two different concentrations (Community Development and Social Action or Development Management) and select among a diversity of elective courses.
  • Gain access and exposure to both international and community development professionals through the connections of SIT faculty, alumni, and program partners in Vermont and worldwide.
  • Learn through experience—including through the six-month practicum phase and optional field courses—and through the experience of SIT peers and faculty.

Beginning in fall 2014, students in the program will be able to acquire a specialization in one of the following professional areas:

  • Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Social Innovation and Management
  • Policy Analysis and Advocacy

Join a global network of development projects and professionals.

SIT Graduate Institute is the higher education institution of World Learning, a leading international development organization, and as such is uniquely qualified to prepare its graduates to work with communities around the world in meeting their development needs. By drawing on the World Learning/SIT global network of contacts and development projects, SIT students can advance their careers by building connections worldwide.

On-Campus Coursework
Two Terms (9 months)
(28 credits)
Practicum
Two–Three Terms (6–12 months)
(12 credits)
Capstone Paper and Presentation
Fall Term: September–December
Field Courses (optional): January
Language Intensives (optional): January
Spring Term: January–May
 
Two or three terms working with an organization Final paper and presentation on campus
  • Core Coursework (28 credits)
    During students’ nine months on campus, they examine competing theories and alternative approaches to development practice. The program focuses on participatory, rights-based interventions in local, national, and international contexts. Coursework provides a comprehensive education in development praxis, combining theoretical and applied knowledge.

    The following 16 courses are required:
    • Foundations in Intercultural Service, Leadership, and Management – 4 credits
    • Practitioner Inquiry – 3 credits
    • Economics – 3 credits
    • Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development – 3 credits
    • Issues in Sustainable Development – 3 credits

    Students take an additional 12 credits of relevant coursework, which includes one or more of the following degree courses:
    • Program Planning and Management – 3 credits
    • Monitoring and Evaluation – 3 credits
    • Policy Advocacy – 3 credits
    • Popular and Nonformal Education – 2 credits

    Other course options include:
    • Training Design for Experiential Learning – 3 credits
    • Social Identity: Exclusion and Inclusion – 3 credits
    • Dismantling Disability – 2 credits
    • Post-War Development and Peacebuilding – 3 credits
    • Initiatives in Peacebuilding – 3 credits
    • Skills and Practices in Inter-Group Dialogue – 3 credits
    • Conflict and Identity – 3 credits
    • Education for Social Justice – 3 credits
    • Program Planning and Project Design – 3 credits
    • Budgeting and Financial Management – 3 credits
    • Fundraising and Grant Writing – 2 credits
    • Human Resources Management – 3 credits
    • Strategic Planning and Implementation – 3 credits
    • Social Entrepreneurship – 3 credits
    • Leadership and Change – 3 credits
    • Nonprofit, NGO, and Social Business Management – 3 credits
    • Statistics for Practitioners – 1 credit
    • Youth Program Leadership – 3 credits
    • Training for Social Action – 3 credits
    • Policy Analysis and Advocacy Methods – 3 credits
    • International Policy and Citizen Advocacy – 1 credit
    • Leadership, Community, and Coalition Building – 3 credits
    • Special Topics in Sustainable Development – 1–3 credits
  • Optional Concentrations
    Interested students are able to focus their studies in sustainable development by choosing a concentration. Two concentrations are being offered during the 2014–2015 academic year:

    Community Development and Social Action. The focus of this concentration is on knowledge and skills related to community outreach, education, and social mobilization with community-based organizations in both the Global South and North.

    Development Management. The focus of this concentration is on knowledge and skills related to the program planning and evaluation cycle (from needs assessment to impact assessment) and on the larger organizational and management context in which programs are created.
     
  • Area Specializations
    Students may also choose a six-credit sequence of courses that constitute a specialization in one of the following areas:
     
    • Monitoring and Evaluation
    • Social Innovation and Management
    • Policy Analysis and Advocacy
       
  • Reflective Practice (12 credits)
    This portion of the program is a structured approach for students to apply coursework learning to a related professional activity. During this phase, students receive course credit for documenting the integration of their knowledge and skills while working in a professional context, for a minimum of six months, and remaining engaged with faculty and other students on the program. Students can complete the practicum in the US or abroad.
  • Capstone Paper and Seminar
    Students demonstrate, assess, and synthesize their learning through preparation of a capstone project and participation in a one-week capstone seminar held multiple times each year on SIT’s campus in Vermont. Researching and writing the capstone paper takes students deeply into the experiential learning cycle, where they explore the meaning of the practicum experience, integrate theory and practice in written and oral presentations, and make a contribution to the field of sustainable development. Review past Sustainable Development capstone papers.

Degree Requirements
Students have five years from the time they enter the program to complete all degree requirements. (For any student who, because of special circum­stances, studies part-time during two consecutive on-campus academic years, the program entry date is calculated from the beginning of their second on-campus year.) A student who does not complete all degree requirements (including the language and culture proficiency requirement) within five years of the entry date will be withdrawn from the program. A student with extenuating circumstances must apply to the dean of the program for an extension.

All students must fulfill a Language and Culture Proficiency Requirement before they are eligible to graduate.

View the current academic calendar.

Study abroad as part of your master’s degree program.

International and US-Based Intensive Courses
Students have the option of completing a short-term intensive course at sites in the US or abroad. Typically ranging in duration from one to four weeks, recent intensives have been offered in Washington, DC; Morocco; Mexico; and Turkey.

Intensive field courses offer students pursuing an MA in sustainable development the chance to interact with practitioners in the field, learn on-site, and expand professional networking. Short-term intensives are typically offered in January. Learn more about the intensive field courses.

View our 2015 course offerings

Apply the knowledge and skills you acquire in the classroom while engaging in the field of sustainable development in real-world settings.

Professional Practicum
Following the on-campus coursework phase, each student completes a professional practicum with an organization of his/her choosing.* The practicum must be related to the student’s coursework and career goals and be for a minimum of six months. Practicums may be paid professional positions or unpaid internships.
 

Thailand
Working at an elephant rehabilitation camp in Thailand

During this period — referred to as Reflective Practice — students remain engaged with faculty and other students and receive course credit for documenting the integration of their knowledge and skills while working in a professional context.
 
Practicum placements provide in-depth, hands-on learning; enhance résumés; and expand professional contacts.
 
Recent practicum placements held by students in the sustainable development program include:
 
United States

  • Program Director, Africa Projects, NextAid (Los Angeles, California)
  • Program Coordinator, Foundation for Sustainable Development (San Francisco, California)
  • Economics Intern, United Nations Development Programme (New York, New York)
  • Food Access and Urban Agriculture Intern, Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County (Indianapolis, Indiana)
  • Micro Credit Projects Coordinator, American Relief Agency for the Horn of Africa (Minneapolis, Minnesota)
  • Short-term Consultant, World Bank (Washington, DC)
  • Kiva Fellow, Kiva Microfunds (San Francisco, California)
  • Legislative Intern, Bluegreen Alliance (Washington, DC)
  • Policy Research Analyst/Intern, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (Burlington, Vermont)
  • Program Coordinator, Fair Trade Resource Network (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
  • Economic Justice Intern, Oxfam America (Boston, Massachusetts)
  • Micro Business Loan Developer, Holy Rosary Credit Union (Kansas City, Missouri)
  • Program Advocate, FAIR Fund (Washington, DC)

International

  • Proposal Writer and Project Manager, FORMATEL (Haiti)
  • Commissioner, National Elections Commission (Liberia)
  • Program Officer, Embassy of Sweden Nairobi (Kenya)
  • Program Assistant/Intern, ProAct Network (Switzerland)
  • Project Manager, CARE International (Switzerland)
  • Research Intern, Tibetan Women's Association (India)
  • Monitoring/Evaluation Coordinator, The Environment and Rural Development Foundation (Cameroon)
  • Assistant Research Team Leader, Norwegian People's Aid (Norway)
  • Coordinator, Migrants Rights International (Switzerland)

* Students find positions on their own with support from SIT's Career and Practicum Services Center.

meg audetteThe program prepares professionals to:

  • Design and lead sustainable development programs
  • Coordinate funding for development initiatives, nonprofit organizations, and small businesses
  • Develop and manage projects that address economic inequities and/or encourage responsible use of natural resources

Acquire skills and training to work in a wide range of development-related fields.
Students develop skills to work in community development, economic development, and many other areas of need across the globe, through coursework and field study. Students gain professional experience through an extended practicum with an organization of their choice that is relevant to their professional goals.
 
Graduates are equipped to work in a wide range of fields, including community capacity building, economic development, human rights, education, food security, health, gender equity, nonprofit and NGO management, and social entrepreneurship.

Faculty for the MA in Sustainable Development: Advocacy, Leadership, and Social Change program in Vermont are experienced development professionals. They include practitioner-scholars based on SIT’s Vermont campus and adjunct faculty from the Washington, DC Center, southern Vermont, and the surrounding region. The MA in Sustainable Development: Advocacy, Leadership, and Social Change program draws upon other campus-based resources, including the professional development staff in SIT Study Abroad, and leaders of both local organizations and organizations around the world, often through visits and video conferences. Many of these individuals serve as guest lecturers and practicum advisors for SIT students.

Teresa Healy
Teresa Healy

Associate Professor
Sustainable Development

PhD, Carleton University
MA, York University

Teresa Healy earned her doctorate in political science from Carleton University in Ottawa. Her work focuses on social movements’ struggles for equity and community-based sustainability in times of economic crisis.

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Nikoi Kote-Nikoi
Nikoi Kote-Nikoi

Professor
Sustainable Development

PhD, MA, University of Massachusetts
BA, Vassar College

Nikoi Kote-Nikoi, who holds a doctorate in economics, has been a member of SIT Graduate Institute's faculty since 1989. He also has served as a policy analyst and director of research at the Institute of Economic Affairs in his native Ghana, and as a visiting professor at the University of Copenhagen, Marlboro College, and the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration.

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Kanthie Athukorala
Kanthie Athukorala

Assistant Professor
Sustainable Development

EdD, MEd, University of Massachusetts
BEd, National University of Lesotho

Kanthie Athukorala holds a doctorate in international education. A member of SIT Graduate Institute's faculty since 2000, she teaches courses in research methods, theory and practice of sustainable development, and assessment and evaluation. 

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Jeff Unsicker
Jeff Unsicker

Professor and Chair
Sustainable Development

PhD, MA, Stanford University
BA, University of California, San Diego

Jeff Unsicker completed graduate studies in international development, education, policy analysis, and administration. His research focused on the political economy of foreign aid for adult education, rural development, and Ujamaa socialism in Tanzania. A member of SIT's faculty since 1990, Jeff has also served as academic dean and interim president of SIT Graduate Institute.

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Charles Curry-Smithson
Charles Curry-Smithson

Professor
Sustainable Development

PhD, MA, The Fielding Institute
MA, Saint Louis University
MRE, MDiv, New York University
BA, Glen Ellyn College

Charles Curry-Smithson holds a doctorate in human and organizational systems as well as four master's degrees in organizational development, sociology, religious education, and theology. A member of SIT Graduate Institute's faculty since 1989, Charlie teaches courses in social change, policy advocacy, leadership and organizations, program planning and project design, and monitoring and evaluation.

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To be considered for admission to the MA in Sustainable Development program, an applicant must meet the following criteria:

  • US bachelor's degree or an equivalent that demonstrates academic ability
  • Demonstrated English language ability (see details below)
  • Intercultural and professional experience
  • Demonstrated ability to use experience as a source of learning

VT campus in fallEnglish Language Ability
Applicants whose first language is not English and who did not attend an undergraduate institution atwhich the language of instruction was English must take either the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System).

  • Applicants taking the TOEFL must receive a minimum score of 550 on the paper-based test or 213 on the computer-based test.
  • For the new Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL iBT), SIT's operational standard for admission for applicants whose first language is not English and who did not attend an undergraduate institution at which the language of instruction was English is a minimum total score of 79. This includes section scores of at least 24 on the writing section and 23 on the speaking section. These section scores should be considered guidelines for recommended minimum scores on the new TOEFL exam.
  • Applicants taking the IELTS must receive a score of Band 6.0 or higher.

These scores are considered the minimum proficiency needed to undertake graduate-level work. Scores must be dated within two years of the start date of your academic program at SIT.

SIT Graduate Institute’s Selection Process
Our admissions staff work one-on-one with every applicant to facilitate a highly informed and multidimensional admissions experience: applicants are encouraged to attend an open house, talk with SIT faculty and staff, and hear from current students and alumni. As applicants become familiar with the attributes of an SIT education — grounded in the experiential learning model and focused on social justice and leadership skills in intercultural environments — they determine for themselves in what ways SIT can help them meet their educational and career objectives.

Direct Costs

Tuition and Fees

Year 1 Fall Spring  
Tuition $15,630 $15,630  
Fees $785 $785  
Year 2 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Tuition $2,050 $2,050 $2,050

MA degree total tuition and fees (all terms combined): $38,980

Indirect Costs*

Books and Personal Expenses

Year 1 Fall Spring  
Books $400 $400  
Personal Expenses $1,350 $1,350  
Year 2 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Books $400 $400 $400
Personal Expenses $1,350 $1,350 $900

Housing and Transportation Costs

Year 1 Fall Spring  
On-Campus Room and Board $4,420 $4,420  
Off-Campus Room and Board* $5,175 $5,175  
Transportation Costs for On-Campus Students $600 $600    
Transportation Costs for Off-Campus Students $1,125 $1,125  
Year 2 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3
Off-Campus Room and Board* $5,175 $5,175 $3,450
Transportation Costs $1,125 $1,125 $750

* Note: SIT estimates the costs to students for transportation, personal/miscellaneous expenses, and off-campus housing/food. Individual expenses may vary. Off-campus housing and transportation costs are based on student survey data; individual costs will vary depending on a variety of factors including type of housing and location of practicum.


Additional Costs

Field Study Courses: Costs range from $1,975 to $4,545. See details on the locations, schedule, and costs of individual field courses.

Reflective Practice: Travel, housing, and other costs associated with the reflective practice phase vary depending on location and duration of position.

Health Insurance: Health insurance costs vary by student, and are based on a variety of factors including place of residence, income, age, and policy type.

Estimated Student Loan Fees:

Year 1: $800

Year 2: $300

Estimated fees are based on the average amount borrowed by SIT Graduate Institute students. See details on student loan options.

Billing

Direct costs and on-campus room and board are billed by SIT Graduate Institute. Indirect, off-campus housing costs, transportation expenses, and additional costs are not billed by SIT, but represent educational expenses associated with being an enrolled student.

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© SIT Graduate Institute 2014

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